Seven Things:

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I’ve always loved internet round ups so I thought I’d start doing them at least once a month. I’ve made a few before, but this time I’m making a format and going to try to stick with it. So here are seven things from around the web!

  • Since I’ve started working again I suddenly need to wear less of my beloved denim and more dress pants. These slacks are going to be the only ones I buy from now on.
  • It’s a dream come true! Joanna Gaines is opening a line at Target. Excuse me as I go buy things for the apartment I have yet to move into.
  • If you’re a bookworm and/or a writer, this twitter feed has been making me laugh recently. It’s been a wonderful addition to my timeline, because I’ve recently done a lot of unfollowing to get rid of politics and bring in things I love.
  • I saw this seven year old being a fashion CEO on my Facebook timeline the other day and started laughing very loudly in my cubical. This is basically how I imagine the fashion world works.
  • This song off of Thomas Rhett’s new album is sublime. I’m obsessed with it.
  • My last blog post on mental health got featured. It’s the first time that’s ever happened, so I was beyond excited to see it. I’m really glad I added that category to my blog this year.
  • I love good satire news, I recently found the Christian version of the Onion.  I didn’t expect it to be so good.

Is depression just a mindset or is it just a chemical imbalance?

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This titles a tease, because it’s both. But the internet has been arguing about it lately, so I thought I would roll up my sleeves and dive one in.

This argument has been around for a few years now, it’s been talked about enough that I felt the need to put a disclaimer on my “How to Embrace a Happy Life” post that talked about how beating depression isn’t as simple as choosing to be happy, even though there really shouldn’t have been a way to get that from the post.

People who fight depression have gotten sick of hearing those kind of lines, which is completely understandable. What isn’t understandable is the argument that depression is only a chemical imbalance that doesn’t have much to do with mindset.

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You’re a person, you don’t have to stay on brand all the time.

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In this social media world we live in it’s easy to get caught up in our aesthetic. I don’t think that word was a part of my everyday vocabulary until about two or three years ago. In some ways it’s wonderful to be able to express exactly what you like so easily. It’s nice being able to control what kind of vibes you let off into the world.

But, this shift in how we’re presenting ourselves has lead us to keeping certain parts of ourselves ‘offline’ or just generally ‘out of sight’. I know I’ve faced this myself, having a great memory or picture but not wanting to post it because it doesn’t fit with my Instagram feed. Or even offline, finding a dress I really like and would wear but not buying it because I don’t know if it really meshes with my style.

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When Self-Acceptance Gets in Our Way:

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Self-acceptance is really important. As someone who was bullied very badly as a child I’ll be the first to praise loving yourself even when others don’t. Self-acceptance isn’t very controversial, nor should it be, but it has its down falls when its taken too far. And I’m not talking about narcissism. I’m talking about when self-acceptance gets in your way of progress.

You should never be 100% satisfied with yourself. It’s dangerous, because it means that you don’t try to improve yourself. That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t be happy with yourself. You can accept yourself as being the beautiful work in progress you are. In fact, that’s what you should do.

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Our electronics are getting smarter. Are we?

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I keep thinking about how I need to be spending less time online, because I’m not only spending my free time sucked into a device, but I’m also doing it at work now. I’ll unplug briefly while on the horse or at dinner with a friend, but I feel like the only time I’m truly 100% unplugged is when I’m asleep and that is terrifying.

I’ve read a lot of posts and articles on smartphone addiction and every time I do I feel great proudly announcing that I’m not addicted to my phone, because in fact, I actually forget my phone and don’t have it on me all that often. But here’s the hitch, and it’s a really big one, I’m addicted to my laptop, so it really doesn’t matter whether I have my phone or not. Obviously with a laptop I’m only drawn to it when I’m at home. When I’m out of the house I don’t think about checking anything or tweeting out, but the moment I step through my front door I feel a gravitational pull towards it.

I’ve fallen into a routine of checking certain sites for updates, and listening to lectures and podcasts while I do it so I feel productive. I’m not being productive. I’m feeding myself the exact same type of information every single day. It’s become completely mindless.

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Four reasons to forgive those who’ve done you wrong:

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“Why should I forgive them? They did me wrong and they never apologized.”

We’ve all had these moments when we’re upset, we’re hurt, we’re angry, and we’re completely unwilling to let go of our hard feelings. Those feelings are justified and we know it, but they aren’t supposed to last. Here are four reasons to forgive people who’ve done you wrong.

Grudges take a lot of time: We can talk about how healing forgiving someone is in a second, but lets start with this, when you’re holding onto a grudge you’re spending way to much time on someone who probably isn’t spending anytime on you. Toxic people aren’t worth your time. You might rant about it some to friends, but when your not it will keep coming back up in your thoughts, and it does that for a reason, because your mind doesn’t like when emotions go unresolved, by not forgiving someone you are keeping their tab open in your mind, you have to tie up those feelings, and you can’t do that and keep a grudge at the same time.

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Who taught you that? Asking where your ideas came from.

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I’ve been doing a lot of thinking lately, and the good kind, not the kind where I get really caught up in my own anxieties. I’ve been listening to a lot of smart people, but they haven’t been telling me what to think, which I’ve grown accustom to through years of schooling. No, these people I’ve found through varies outlets on my laptop, where asking me questions. They wanted me to produce the answers for myself.

In a debate I heard someone ask “who taught you that?” to someone who was presenting one of their most dramatic viewpoints, something that they saw completely as fact.

Who taught me my dramatic viewpoints? The answer isn’t one person, it hardly ever is. We tend to take notes from hundreds of people and then write our essays. That’s how we should do it anyways, if your answer is easily a single person than you should probably go take some more notes, even if it’s just to compare and contrast.

But the question got me thinking about how sometimes when we learn things we don’t question it. We just take someone’s (or a group of people’s) ideas and adapt them, they simply become our own. This happens a lot when we are surrounded by one kind of idea. When our notes are one sided.

It’s also why we can see such dramatic phases in our lives when we look back. Who were you around when you went into that stage. Who taught you that way of life?

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