Who taught you that? Asking where your ideas came from.

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I’ve been doing a lot of thinking lately, and the good kind, not the kind where I get really caught up in my own anxieties. I’ve been listening to a lot of smart people, but they haven’t been telling me what to think, which I’ve grown accustom to through years of schooling. No, these people I’ve found through varies outlets on my laptop, where asking me questions. They wanted me to produce the answers for myself.

In a debate I heard someone ask “who taught you that?” to someone who was presenting one of their most dramatic viewpoints, something that they saw completely as fact.

Who taught me my dramatic viewpoints? The answer isn’t one person, it hardly ever is. We tend to take notes from hundreds of people and then write our essays. That’s how we should do it anyways, if your answer is easily a single person than you should probably go take some more notes, even if it’s just to compare and contrast.

But the question got me thinking about how sometimes when we learn things we don’t question it. We just take someone’s (or a group of people’s) ideas and adapt them, they simply become our own. This happens a lot when we are surrounded by one kind of idea. When our notes are one sided.

It’s also why we can see such dramatic phases in our lives when we look back. Who were you around when you went into that stage. Who taught you that way of life?

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Is My Style Right for… Blogging?

aI tweeted earlier today “Can I be a fun blogger without a white desk and an apple computer??” I meant it in a joking way, but let’s be honest, isn’t that all you see? So… should you be concerned about being successful when you don’t have the exact same aesthetic? No. Not all. And I’ll tell you why, it’s good to be different! It’s good to have a little sway in your style, because you want something to set you apart.

This picture for example was taken with my mom’s ipad, because, you guessed it, I don’t have one! As you can see, my handwriting isn’t flawless. If you look through my social media it’s not the same tactic as most bloggers. And I know I’m just starting out, I haven’t built up the followers that everyone else has, but I have done something that I feel like is important, and that’s going with the flow while still standing out.

  • Copy Quality, not Style. Quality is important no matter what style you produce, if you’ve got good quality photos and posts on your hand, your style is not something you should be too overly concerned about when comparing it to others.
  • Keep Your Personality in Every Post. You don’t have to tell a personal story with everything you post, but you need to have your own voice. People relate to people, and you’ll find people who relate to you. You don’t have to appeal to everyone as long as you appeal to the right people… your people.
  • Collect Ideas and Mix Them. Everyone finds inspiration in others, that’s nothing to be ashamed of! But don’t look through one blog at a time, or even one type of blog, go through a mixture of them at a time and then merge ideas into new fresh ones of your own. You know that saying “there is no new ideas”. It’s mostly true when it comes to blogging, but there is always new ways to present them.
  • Get Options. If your hiring someone, get more than two options, more than three. If your doing it yourself, don’t just stop with your first design. We all know when we like something, but when given a handful of things that we like, we tend to pick things that are more “us”.