“I’m starting first thing tomorrow. Today has already been lost.”

66379865_327544888201159_8962967796036141056_n

I’ve written a lot about habits and goals and getting out of ruts lately. It’s because I’ve been in a few of them. My life is going really well, but there are minor aspects of it need to be ignited again. Hobbies need to be restarted. Diets need to be started. Friends need to be reached out to.

But I’m having problems jump starting it because I, like a lot of people, want to start tomorrow. Tomorrow normally doesn’t come, or if it does, I make a mistake and then announce that I might as well start the next day and not count today, because, who wants to start with a failure?

Already ate a doughnut? We’ve ruined the diet we might as well eat poorly the rest of the day and start clean tomorrow. Already procrastinated past your scheduled work time? Might as well just try again tomorrow, no reason to start late. Ran out of time in your week to see friends, might as well wait till next week instead of reaching out. It’s constant. Tomorrow is always better even when we said it yesterday. It’s a cycle and one we honestly don’t want to break because it’s hard to break and we don’t want to put in the work.

Continue reading

Dealing with the inbetween.

brigitte-tohm-j8C66j15nAk-unsplash

You know that feeling when you’re waiting on things to pass? Whether you’re waiting for a big career move to shake out or waiting for a doctors appointment these little moments of waiting seem to take over a big part of our lives. Sometime, it can even feel like we’re always in a stage of waiting.

It’s easy to say not to focus on it, and in someways that’s very good advice. Distract yourself, work on other projects. Pour your time into making sure you are the best you can be when whatever event roles around. There is a ton you can do to get past the wait, to move forward and not let time be completely in control of your life. And I absolutely think people should focus on doing just that.

But there is sometimes when the wait is hovering over you like a storm cloud and it’s harder to shake, even when you are pouring yourself into other things, even when you are focusing on improving and moving forward. Sometimes it’s just that dark out while you wait to be let in.

I get it. I’m even there with you.

But what is there to do? How do you learn to enjoy the inbetween?

Continue reading

Share your genius:

camilla-bundgaard-hrW9Ygf-v7k-unsplash

I’m reading (listening) to a book on Da Vinci by Walter Isaacson. I might make a book review of it later but I wanted to make a separate post about a theme that runs through this book. Da Vinci was a chronic procrastinator. He did amazing work that he was interested in, but the moment he lost interest he stopped (sometimes mid painting). He left behind hoards of studies that could have changed medicine and city structures but never did because he found editing and publishing too bothersome. He wanted to learn, not share, and in theory there is nothing wrong with this. Your time is your time, no matter how you want to use it or share it. I’m not arguing that he didn’t have the right to keep his findings to himself. I’m saying it’s a shame he did.

Da Vinci found out how our heart valves worked in his unpublished studies. Nobody gave mind to his theory until new researchers rediscovered what he did in 1960. Nineteen-sixty. He was that ahead of his time, that genius, but he didn’t share because of the work  load it would take.

Lucky for him we have found all his notebooks and know of his genius, but I’m betting for a lot of great minds this isn’t true. I’m guessing that there are a lot of great minds like him, who love the thrill of learning but don’t love the work that goes into sharing, and I’m guessing that their work has been lost over the years. It’s even more of a threat now that most work is done digitally. How many floppy-disks full of information have simply been thrown in landfills at this point?

Continue reading

Good role models aren’t the ones trying to influence people.

20180721_125500.jpg

Instagram influencers. Political influencers. Bloggers even.

If you scan the internet it seems that people aren’t just sharing their lives with you, but they’re trying to get you to live more like them. Whether it’s by changing your lifestyle, buying brands, or changing your opinions, there are a lot of people who want you to change. Maybe they want to be the standard that you’re reaching for, maybe they just like the fame. Whatever the case, the people who are trying hard to influence and be role models… they’re not normally the people you should aspire to be.

The best role models are ones that guide you through life. Their values are set and admirable and their life, despite it’s struggles, has joy in it on a really fundamental level. The best role models are moral ones. They are the content ones. And they are the ones we’d still like to be like when they are in their seventies. Good role models aren’t hard to find, despite what people say, there are a lot of good people in this world. Of course no one is perfect, but a good role model doesn’t pretend to be. They wear their flaws and they work on bettering them.

Continue reading

Bald Head Island Photo Diary:

20190910_190903.jpg

Chris and I went to Bald Head Island for our Honeymoon. It’s an island I’ve really grown to love over the years. I went first as a child when, at the time, a family friend had a house there. I then went again for a photography course in college. We went then in the middle of the winter. It still held my heart. So when we were looking at places to go on our honeymoon I couldn’t help but suggest it.

IMG_20190912_174438_360.jpg

It’s a beautiful island off the coast of North Carolina. It makes me love my home state even more than I already did. Something about having the mountains in one direction and the beach in the other is truly beautiful.

Continue reading

It’s Mrs. Smith now.

Anna-Bridals-SmallWebFiles-055 (1).jpg

Photo by Sarah Warden Photography

Hello! Sorry for the time off, I was a little busy getting married and going on my honeymoon. It was a busy week before the wedding, we had a house guest and we had a lot of prep work to do. But despite any stress leading up to the event the wedding itself was perfect. It was everything I could have ever imagined. My only complaint is that it went by too fast! I wish I could go back and relive it.

Marriage is a big life event, it’s one I’ve been waiting and praying for. I have responsibility for more than myself now. I am two parts of a whole and I am 100% in. There is no half-assing anything at this point. I’m excited to go on this adventure with Chris and I’m excited to take on the world with him at my side. It feels exactly like it’s supposed to. Or at least, how I imagine it is supposed to. It’s hard to say for sure, I’ve never been married before and I’ll never be married again.

Continue reading

Learning hobbies and skills as adults:

 

plush-design-studio-l3N9Q27zULw-unsplash

I’m currently reading The Letters of Vincent Van Gogh (along with about five other books, but I regress). I was struck last night while reading by the adult drive to master a craft. I think we all have a tendency to believe that creativity is something formed when we are young. We either had it nourished or we didn’t. It’s easy to believe that when we ask amazing artists when they started painting and they answer elementary school, or the novelist that answers high school.

Maybe it’s because kids don’t fear failing, maybe it’s because if you’re bad at art in elementary school nobody is going to ask why you still bother to draw. You have permission to enjoy something even if the output isn’t worthy. It’s one of  the most amazing things about being young. We have room to fail and with that we have room to grow.

We still do some of this as adults, we all take on tasks at our jobs that we don’t know how to do and flounder around with it until we figure it out, and we keep figuring it out until we master it. But when it comes to things that are vastly seen as hobbies, our drive to work on them seems to be stunted. It suddenly becomes a waste of time. It’s not making money and it’s not getting things done so it’s not worth it.

But we all know it’s not true, we all know what creative outlets do for the soul. We all know that you could in fact turn this into something that profits later on (or not, but it’s an option). You’re not wasting time because as you produce bad works over and over again you are improving, slowly, but steadily.

Continue reading