Giving yourself more dimension: Why it’s important to explore things out of our norm.

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I wrote a post about labels this month, and my first way keep labels from working against you was to mix them up, because we’re individuals and our labels shouldn’t read them same as everyone else’s. The truth is I feel like a lot of people generify themselves so they can fit into a nice little package, whether they’re chasing a brand, an aesthetic, or simply want to be more liked.

I’ve noticed that a lot of my hobbies and loves let me fit into a neat little package, then when people get to know me they’re knocked off their feet by one of my more obscure fascinations or hobbies, not because they’re that rare, but because they never would have placed them with me. They only had a surface level reading of me and there’s always much more going on under the surface. We’re all like this, none of this new.

But what is a newer trend is collectivism, wanting to fit into to a certain group seamlessly and having all of our friends match us in hobbies and ideals. Okay, maybe that isn’t new either, but it’s growing and growing fast. I blame the internet for this, and I blame peoples insistence that you need to pick a side on everything from hobbies to politics to which TV show reigns supreme. You’ve heard of the sinking middle class, but what about the sinking middle ground? When we don’t have middle ground we tend to jump to one side as quickly as possible and leave all the stuff across the line to stay hidden or simply rot out of existence. It’s bad. That other stuff is just as important to who you are.

I hear people say “I lost interest in volleyball because I threw myself into art school and all that goes with it.” or “I lost interest in romance novels because I got my English degree and moved on to “high-brow” literature.”

It’s a common thing. Ask your friends why they dropped things they loved. Ask yourself why you stopped doing that hobby you loved three years ago. We all have our reasons, but I bet most of us didn’t spend a lot of time reviewing those reasons. If we were to, would we still think of them as legitimate enough to have dropped something we loved?

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Back to the Girl I Was:

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Sometimes I wonder if I’ve strayed from who I was when I was little. Certainly life has taken me on a different path. Seven year old Anna was completely confident, unapologetic, and so energetic. The confidence and unapologetic ways were stolen from me at age twelve from aggressive bullying. But like things do, they recovered, they grew back. I wouldn’t say they are stronger, but they are here.

I’ve always had this idea that we have core traits programmed into us, that our childhood selves can tell a lot about who we will become, not because we won’t change, but because some things will always come back.

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Is My Style Right for… Blogging?

aI tweeted earlier today “Can I be a fun blogger without a white desk and an apple computer??” I meant it in a joking way, but let’s be honest, isn’t that all you see? So… should you be concerned about being successful when you don’t have the exact same aesthetic? No. Not all. And I’ll tell you why, it’s good to be different! It’s good to have a little sway in your style, because you want something to set you apart.

This picture for example was taken with my mom’s ipad, because, you guessed it, I don’t have one! As you can see, my handwriting isn’t flawless. If you look through my social media it’s not the same tactic as most bloggers. And I know I’m just starting out, I haven’t built up the followers that everyone else has, but I have done something that I feel like is important, and that’s going with the flow while still standing out.

  • Copy Quality, not Style. Quality is important no matter what style you produce, if you’ve got good quality photos and posts on your hand, your style is not something you should be too overly concerned about when comparing it to others.
  • Keep Your Personality in Every Post. You don’t have to tell a personal story with everything you post, but you need to have your own voice. People relate to people, and you’ll find people who relate to you. You don’t have to appeal to everyone as long as you appeal to the right people… your people.
  • Collect Ideas and Mix Them. Everyone finds inspiration in others, that’s nothing to be ashamed of! But don’t look through one blog at a time, or even one type of blog, go through a mixture of them at a time and then merge ideas into new fresh ones of your own. You know that saying “there is no new ideas”. It’s mostly true when it comes to blogging, but there is always new ways to present them.
  • Get Options. If your hiring someone, get more than two options, more than three. If your doing it yourself, don’t just stop with your first design. We all know when we like something, but when given a handful of things that we like, we tend to pick things that are more “us”.