Expanding horizons: On Friendships built on Differences

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Have you ever met someone that you have nothing in common with and it bloom into a friendship? It’s an interesting situation, and I mean that in the best way, these people can help you grow and widen your horizons, but they can also just be interesting people to discuss things with.

I think we’ve lost a lot of the art of being friends with different people. We like to surround ourselves with replications of ourselves. We like to know what kind of advice we’re going to get. We like to do our hobbies with other people who like our hobbies. Even if we don’t mean them to be, our friends tend to be very similar to each other. But they don’t need to be, we can have friends from all walks of life with all sorts of different hobbies and ideals. We might not get the joy of hearing our opinions spoken back to us, but we can learn about different ideas and we can fall in love with different activities, or types of music, or books.

We grow when we’re introduced to new and exciting things, but we also are mammals completely dependent on having support systems and being loved. We can find that love in company with all sorts of people.

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The “FitBit” Method:

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I don’t have a Fitbit, but I know enough people who do to understand the drive towards getting in your daily steps. It’s a big deal to beat your friends or even beat yourself. It’s a fun easy way to motivate you to be more active. It’s a genius idea.

I found myself applying that logic lazily when I thought about reaching my social activity levels. The other morning I talked to my hairdresser while getting a cut, talked to a stranger in line for 30 minutes at the social security office, and I went and ate lunch with my mom. I had this brief image of a empty bar filling right up. I felt like I reached my mandatory social needs for the day, and that even if I did nothing else for the day I wouldn’t feel isolated.

We need to be active. We need to be social. These are parts of a healthy life. We also need to drink a certain amount of water, consume a certain amount of vitamins, earn a certain amount of money, do enough positive actions, and think enough positive thoughts. We have all these daily bars to fill, and we hardly ever think about it in those terms, but maybe we should.

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5 Ways to Meet People After you Leave College:

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Graduation is hard on friendships. It’s hard because the ones you have scatter, and finding new ones is a lot more complicated then it was. We’ve been in school all our lives. We’ve always had pools of similarly-aged people to form relationships with. It’s honestly amazing when you think about it.

Now you can meet people at work in the same way. You can become great friends with co-workers. But they aren’t always in the same walk of life as you, and while that doesn’t mean you won’t be close, it does mean that you might need to find those people who are elsewhere.

So how do you do it? What do you do? Here’s my five suggestions on ways to meet people after college:

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Hacks to Living Life to It’s Fullest:

 

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If you’re like me- you spend a little too much time online. A little too much time ‘relaxing’. A little too much time putting off the things you need to do, which in turn keeps you from being able to do the things you want. Procrastination is hardly a out of reach concept for anyone in their early twenties, especially when you’re in college. And though, you’re hopefully like me and pull through anyways, it means that you’re lacking a bit when it comes to living life fuller.

So here are some tips to go about living louder, fuller, and just all together better:

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